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Economy Indian Ocean Transparency

Seychelles Condemns Pirate Attack Off The Coast of Hodeidah

The Seychelles government is profoundly worried by the recent attacks on the UAE-flagged vessel in the Red Sea, as Seychelles has long been at the forefront of the battle against piracy in the Western Indian Ocean.

Somali pirates operate in the Gulf of Aden and the Indian Ocean, principally. Attacks have occurred around 1,000 nautical miles off the Somali coast, primarily targeting tankers and dry bulkers, which bring in tens of millions of cash for pirates.

The Gulf of Aden is bordered on the north by Yemen, on the east by the Arabian Sea, on the west by Djibouti, and on the south by the Guardafui Channel, Socotra, Somaliland, and Somalia. It connects to the Red Sea in the northwest through the Bab-el-Mandeb strait, and to the Arabian Sea in the east. Its waterways are among the most perilous in the world for piracy.

In recent years, pirates have moved their focus from hijacking oil tankers to the more lucrative kidnapping of sailors for ransom, according to Noel Choong, the head of the Kuala Lumpur-based IMB piracy reporting center.

The Seychelles government strongly condemns the recent pirate attacks off the coast of Hodeidah on the civilian cargo ship RWABEE.

Such flagrant acts jeopardize regional security and put the safety of the region’s population at risk, in addition to posing major challenges to sea commerce and international trade.

All parties are also urged to follow international law and seek peaceful solutions to the crisis, according to Seychelles.

Seychelles demands that the vessel and her crew be released immediately in light of the circumstances.

By Kate Flask

Kate Flask is an American freelance writer and digital nomad who studied creative writing in the UK. She has a personal and professional interest in East Africa and Indian Ocean Islands and Runs Seychelles Watch.

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