Categories
Economy Indian Ocean Politics

India & China Influence in Seychelles

India and Seychelles have strengthened their military collaboration with the delivery of equipment and joint training. Allowing India to ensure its presence in the area with the development of its military base in the archipelago.
In addition, the Indian High Commissioner stated that India will assist Seychelles with the construction of a coast guard radar system and other defense issues. After a request from Seychelles’ President and Minster of Defense Wavel Ramkalawan.

Since 2018, the two countries have signed a lease agreement for the island of Assumption for 20 years. The Indians set up a military base there. It is located 370 km northeast of Mayotte. During a handing over ceremony for three ceremonial weapons and ammunition as well as a wave-rider boat gifted by the Indian government, General Dalbir Singh Suhag, a former chief of army staff of the Indian Army, spoke about the radar system donation. Onboard the INS Gharial, the vessel that delivered the firearms and ammo to the island state, the guns and 500 rounds of ammunition were handed over.

The firearms will be used on “important national occasions such as the National Day,” according to Michael Rosette, chief of the Seychelles Defence Forces (SDF). Seychelles, an archipelago in the western Indian Ocean, also received a wave-rider boat, bringing the total number of wave-rider boats in the coast guard’s fleet to three.

Seychelles Coast Guard personnel have been taught to use the newest addition of radar technology to the fleet, which will aid in the island nation’s coastal surveillance. Suhag stated that India and Seychelles have a positive relationship with “many shared fields of concern,” such as terrorism and illegal and irregular fishing.

Military soldiers from the Seychelles and India participated in the 10-day Exercise ‘Lanmitye’ last month, in which they simulated counterinsurgency, counter-terrorism, and anti-piracy operations. Seychelles, an archipelago in the western Indian Ocean, has a long history of defense and security cooperation with India. Maritime security, anti-piracy operations, air surveillance, training, and capacity building are all part of this.

The Indian Ocean is critical to global trade, security, and geopolitics. From the Strait of Malacca and Australia’s western coast in the east to the Mozambique Channel in the west, the Indian Ocean is a large theater. It stretches from the Persian Gulf and the Arabian Sea in the north to the Indian Ocean in the south.

It is quickly establishing itself as the site of competition between India and China. China has used unjust and predatory economic tactics to achieve its geopolitical objectives in the region, most notably by acquiring access to military bases and critical ports.

Four nations in the IOR, namely Djibouti, Laos, Maldives, and Pakistan, are “exposed to above-average debt” to China, according to data from the Center for Global Development. When the Maldives, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka are viewed in the context of China’s acquisition and development of a military facility in Djibouti, it becomes evident that China is surrounding India in its backyard.

One of Narendra Modi’s first international tours after being elected Indian Prime Minister in 2014 was to Sri Lanka, the Seychelles, and Mauritius, where he launched a new “SAGAR” policy (Security and Growth for All in the Region). The Modi government’s goal was to boost India’s economic and political might, improve communication, and protect islands from a variety of security challenges, including climate change. It is also clearly trying to foster regional solidarity as a means of deterring China’s continued growth.

All this is part of India’s plan to counter China’s growing influence and power in the region. However, one must ask themselves what is Seychelles losing out in doing business with India?

Categories
Indian Ocean Politics Transparency

Believe It or Not The President’s Son is a Drug Dealer

A recent drug bust of over two tons of drugs aboard the French vessel Le Floréal was made only 200 nautical miles from Victoria. Taking place within the context of an EU NAVFOR ATALANTA Counter-Narcotics operation, President Wavel Ramkalawan used this as an opportunity to reaffirm that, “Seychelles will continue to cooperate with its international partners in the fight against drugs”.

Considering this statement and The President’s firm commitment to go hard on those engaged in trafficking the drugs which are destroying families in the Seychelles, some might find it hard to believe that Wavel Ramkalawan’s own son Samuel Ramkalawan was implicated, not too long ago, in a drug dealing scandal. It would not be surprising if you have not heard of it considering the efforts Ramkalawan himself, along with his cronies, have made to hush up the story. One might be surprised to see that the President would hush up a story about a son who so embarrassed him in front of the nation with a public fist fight. However, Ramkalawan’s alleged “commitment” to the war on drugs means he cannot afford to be publicly perceived to have a drug dealing member of the family, even if he is not close with Samuel.

February 2021 saw a story reported involving the deportation of two Kenyan nationals, Nassim Anwar Onezime and her Seychellois husband, Andy Terry Onezime for drug dealing. Both were known to law enforcement and had been, according to 2017 Seychelles court documents, suspected by the National Drug Enforcement Agency (NDEA) of heroin trafficking between Kenya & Seychelles as far back as 2013. They had also previously been engaged in a case with the Financial Intelligence Unit (FIU). How Samuel Ramkalawan, the son of The President became mixed up with them is unclear however, what is known it that Nassim was deported back to Kenya on Monday February 1, 2021 in the early hours of the morning onboard an Island Development Company (IDC) aircraft. 

Although President Ramkalawan issued a statement on the subject of the arrest, naturally no mention was made of his own son’s involvement. A later interview given by Nassim similarly made no mention of Samuel’s involvement. It should not be expected that the son of an autocrat caught up in a drug scandal would be made public information, however this is information which the public has the right and duty to know. 

The lightining speed deportation of a drug smuggler caught red handed should raise more than a few eyebrows. Deportation usually takes time and the country in which a criminal is caught due to the need for proper judicial processing of all individuals caught. It is also perplexing why they were deported on a state-owned private airplane run by IDC, where incidentally Samuel Ramkalawan’s brother, Caleb, is a trainee pilot. What exactly was it that the government was trying to hide by getting Nassim out of the country as soon as possible? More likely than not, Samuel Ramkalawan’s involvement in the crime. 

As a President who has emphasized his commitment to the war on drugs, alongside his being a public figure with a commitment to the people, it is unacceptable to be hushing up a story of such significance. While the President himself bears no responsibility for the actions of his adult son, he does have a responsibility to be transparent with the people of the Seychelles. And that means making them aware of his son’s involvement in the illegal drug trade which has been tearing the country apart. 

Even more concerning is what else the President might be hiding from the public. Are there other things we should know about? Backdoor deals taking place enriching himself and his cronies at our expense? Payoffs changing hands to ensure that secrets are well-guarded from the general public? Public tenders being issued without the required transparency and public competition? Other cases that lack fair judicial process?

The law is the law is the law. And if it doesn’t apply to everyone, it applies to no one. This is something President Ramkalawan must understand. It’s time he came forward and was transparent with the people. Without a sense of trust between the President and the people, what is democracy in Seychelles worth? 

Update 29 of April, 2022:

Unlawful arrest of a Kenyan national is the subject of an appeal.

Nasim Onezime, the Kenyan national who was detained and deported to Kenya, had her appeal refused by the Court of Appeal. She filed a petition with the Constitutional Court after her deportation on February 1, 2021, seeking compensation from damages from the government for unlawful arrest and detention that violated numerous of her constitutional rights. The petition included a personal affidavit.